Anime, Miscellaneous

Upper Deck Made Bootleg Yu-Gi-Oh Cards

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?My mind is blown. If yours isn’t, let me see if I can explain this to you.

? When the Yu-Gi-Oh TCG first came to America, it was Upper Deck who made the cards. They had the license for six years.
? Upper Deck has been a respected and popular trading card company for
20 years, making all manner of professional sports cards, and TCGs like
the Marvel Vs. system and the World of Warcraft card game.
? In 2008, Konami — the owners of the Yu-Gi-Oh game, who gave the license to Upper Deck — found some bootleg Yu-Gi-Oh cards distributed by a company called Vintage Sports Cards.
? Vintage Sports Cards said they got the counterfeit cards from Upper Deck.
? AND THEY DID.

Last week, a court found Upper Deck liable for counterfeiting and trademark infringement, which means UPPER DECK WAS SELLING BOOTLEG YU-GI-OH CARDS. WHEN THEY WERE THE ONES MAKING THE LEGAL YU-GI-OH CARDS. Is that not the craziest shit you’ve ever heard? Who would do that? Honestly, the only sellers of anything I can think of are drug dealer, who cut in flour with cocaine and nonsense like that. Hasbo doesn’t make those crazy Spader-Man bootlegs you see in shady mall kiosks, because… well… it doesn’t make any sense. At any rate, nowadays Yu-Gi-Oh! cards are made directly by Konami, and Upper Deck and Konami just settled out of court, with Upper Deck agreeing to pay an undisclosed sum to Konami. Let that be a lesson to all you people who… uh… decide to produce illegal versions of things you can make legally. Or something. (Via Anime News Network)

About Author

Robert Bricken is one of the original co-founders of the site formerly known as Topless Robot, and its first editor-in-chief, serving from 2008-12. He brought the site to prominence with “nerd news, humor and self-loathing” as its motto, raising it from total internet obscurity to a readership in the millions, with help from his savage “FAQ” movie reviews and Fan Fiction Fridays. Under his tenure Topless Robot was covered by Gawker, Wired, Defamer, New York magazine, ABC News, and others, and his articles have been praised by Roger Ebert, Avengers actor Clark Gregg, comedian and The Daily Show correspondent John Hodgman, the stars of Mystery Science Theater 3000 and Rifftrax, and others. He is currently the managing editor of io9.com. Despite decades as both an amateur and professional nerd, he continues to be completely unprepared for either the zombie apocalypse or the robot uprising.