Toys, TV

Star Trek Figures Get McFarlane-esque Makeover, and I Love It.

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Although in scale with previous Star Trek figures, Diamond is calling these Star Trek Select for obvious reasons – the packaging and “figure/diorama” combo is clearly now patterned on Marvel Select.

Though the figures have some articulation, and interchangeable parts (like “Constipated Spock” bonus head), these are more designed for scene-specific display rather than play, taking a McFarlane approach that sometimes the “action” is in the dynamic pose rather than the poseability. McFarlane himself said years ago that he’d love to get hold of the Star Trek license and do it his way – given how dismally Playmates’ last versions of movie-verse action figures turned out (so dismal Hasbro isn’t even trying this year, though they could), I think this is the right approach.

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Because let’s face it, the inherent problem with Star Trek figures is that aside from the head sculpts, we’re talking fairly generic human bodies which aren’t automatically interesting to kids (unless said youngsters are huge fans already), and don’t really capture the appeal of the larger scope of the show by themselves. There are always aliens, but as so many were designed for TV, a lot of them have top-heavy outfits with nothing going on below the waist. By which of course I mean generic black pants all around (I’d never insult a Klingon’s virility, ever. The Ferengi probably have small wieners, though).

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But James T. Kirk mid-air, delivering the motherfucking Dropkick of Doom to KHAAAAAAAAN? Sold. Pre-sold, even. Invest in that shit.

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About Author

Luke Y. Thompson has been writing professionally about movies and pop-culture since 1999, and has also been an actor in some extremely cheap culty and horror movies you will probably never hear much about (he is nonetheless mostly proud of them, as he met his wife on one). As editor of The Robot's Voice since 2012, he can take the blame for the majority of the site's content, all of which he creates because he loves you very, very much. (Although he loves nachos more. Sorry.) Prior to TRV, Luke wrote for publications that include the New Times LA, Los Angeles CityBeat, E! Online, OC Weekly, Geekweek, GeekChicDaily, The L.A. Times, The Village Voice, LA Weekly, and Nerdist