TV

Top-Down Smackdown: WWE’s Take on Superbowl Anti-Sexism Ad Is Really Half-Assed.

0

wwe_likeagirl.jpg

Though it didn’t make our list this morning because I didn’t find it particularly creative, there was a Superbowl ad yesterday that was all about how phrases like “throw like a girl” have unnecessarily negative connotations. It spawned a hashtag, so of course somebody at WWE said something like, “Let’s get something that fits this trending hashtag, quick! It’s about how girls don’t suck at stuff, or whatever.”

Now, for all the crap we give WWE for various things they get wrong, it’s indisputable that they put together some of the best clip packages you’ve ever seen. Show recaps are tightly edited, “in memoriam” reels bring fans to tears, and career highlights are inevitably exciting. So why is this ad so amateurishly cut?

Pick one:
-They had to turn it around in less than a day.
-They have no recent footage from the main roster that actually makes any woman look good, or like a role model.
-Because all the main-roster Divas are based on male fantasy rather than female athleticism, they had to get the not-ready-for-prime-time female performers from NXT.

To be fair, the video description is technically accurate: “WWE NXT Divas redefine what it means to run #LikeAGirl, train #LikeAGirl and fight #LikeAGirl, empowering young female fans everywhere to defy labels and be the best they can be.”

Yes. “WWE NXT Divas.” Just don’t look too hard at the actual, main-roster WWE Divas, who are primarily defined nowadays by a “reality” soap about their love lives.

Now, here’s a question fro those of you who read this feature regularly – is it best to keep it Monday and have comments be a Raw talk-back? Or would it be better to run it Thursday, allowing me to more quickly comment on Monday stuff, and have it be a Smackdown talk-back? Let me know if there’s a preference.

WWE ad via Uproxx

About Author

Luke Y. Thompson has been writing professionally about movies and pop-culture since 1999, and has also been an actor in some extremely cheap culty and horror movies you will probably never hear much about (he is nonetheless mostly proud of them, as he met his wife on one). As editor of The Robot's Voice since 2012, he can take the blame for the majority of the site's content, all of which he creates because he loves you very, very much. (Although he loves nachos more. Sorry.) Prior to TRV, Luke wrote for publications that include the New Times LA, Los Angeles CityBeat, E! Online, OC Weekly, Geekweek, GeekChicDaily, The L.A. Times, The Village Voice, LA Weekly, and Nerdist