Books, TV

New Star Trek-Inspired Poster Book Fires up the Imagination

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startrekposterbook-cover

When I was a kid, I’d often look at books about fictional aliens and worlds, or the future history of space flight, and come up with imaginative play scenarios based on the pictures. In the back garden, friends and I would imagine encountering each of the aliens, or flying a particular craft, and whole afternoons could be spent that way.

Now, there was also text in these books…but I never read it. The visual was enough. For all I know, many of these tomes could have been as terribly written as a Dean Devlin/Roland Emmerich screenplay. It didn’t matter. Which brings me to the Star Trek poster book I recently got sent for review, Star Trek: Ships of the Line Posters. There’s no text here – just images and titles. And if you’re not familiar with the show – not that anyone who’s reading this would ever fall into that category – you might not even recognize some of what you see, because, for example, an image of Voyager battling a Borg cube is given a painting-style title like “Terminal Descent,” rather than, “Voyager fights a Borg Cube.”

AlienShips

All the poster prints are 11 by 14 inches, though because of the aspect ratio, they’re “letterboxed” on white backgrounds with the title, artist name and Star Trek logo below the image.

FutureImperfect Refuge

While these images have appeared before on calendars and as novel covers, this is the first time they’ve appeared on thicker card stock with an eye toward framing. I don’t know that anyone would frame all 24, but any Star Trek fan is bound to find at least one favorite that merits it.

Shirkahr WindTunnel

I would suggest, though, that this would make the best gift for the young Trekker in your life. Make the kid feel like they own some real art, and don’t tell them it cost less than fifteen bucks – they won’t care. The presentation – a cardboard box-sleeve that opens outward and has a sheet of tissue paper covering the prints – gives it an aura of importance, while the images within will stimulate thoughts of an expanded universe.

And I sound really pompous right now. So imagine a fart noise right here to keep things grounded.

About Author

Luke Y. Thompson has been writing professionally about movies and pop-culture since 1999, and has also been an actor in some extremely cheap culty and horror movies you will probably never hear much about (he is nonetheless mostly proud of them, as he met his wife on one). As editor of The Robot's Voice since 2012, he can take the blame for the majority of the site's content, all of which he creates because he loves you very, very much. (Although he loves nachos more. Sorry.) Prior to TRV, Luke wrote for publications that include the New Times LA, Los Angeles CityBeat, E! Online, OC Weekly, Geekweek, GeekChicDaily, The L.A. Times, The Village Voice, LA Weekly, and Nerdist