Cartoons, Video Games

Eoin Duffy’s “Boxy the Box” Is a Gleefully Simple Game With Soul-Crushing Subtext

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boxythebox

We’ve shown off the work of independent animator Eoin Duffy before, and it is generally deceptively simple in style, usually with super-dark, depressing themes underneath. But when we heard he was going to toss it all to go into video game design, we thought, hey, maybe this will be his true joy, and those heinously sad undercurrents in his work might disappear.

On first glance, you might think so. But soon the truth seeps in.

Then you read the press notes:

Boxy the Box is a game by independent animator Eoin Duffy. After Eoin’s animation career skyrocketed in 2014, Eoin decided to abandon logic, switch gears, and consider a side career in game dev. Void of original ideas Eoin chose to further explore an old project from 2012. The project was his first and only venture into game design. So utilizing all his free time (which he’d normally spend with his many friends who exist) Eoin tinkered, heaved & hoed – finally regurgitated a concept that by this time was no longer fresh and new. Delusionally happy with this result, Eoin released the game on the 29nd of October 2015 into an overly saturated games market.

– Eye bleedingly minimal design
– A plethora of unlockable characters
– Endless hours of endless gameplay for questionable results
– Procedurally generated terrain
– Easy to learn, difficult to master
– Two speed options. Slow progression towards full speed – or – constant full speed
– Responsive layout, portrait or landscape
– Non sucky original music
– Passionately crafted premium game available for FREE!
– Reciprocated love

I am glad he has many friends who exist. I hope they monitor his medicine cabinet every night.

Get Boxy the Box, if your brain chemicals can handle it.

– iOS – https://appsto.re/ca/uYK47.i
– ANDROID – https://goo.gl/9mTB4n

About Author

Luke Y. Thompson has been writing professionally about movies and pop-culture since 1999, and has also been an actor in some extremely cheap culty and horror movies you will probably never hear much about (he is nonetheless mostly proud of them, as he met his wife on one). As editor of The Robot's Voice since 2012, he can take the blame for the majority of the site's content, all of which he creates because he loves you very, very much. (Although he loves nachos more. Sorry.) Prior to TRV, Luke wrote for publications that include the New Times LA, Los Angeles CityBeat, E! Online, OC Weekly, Geekweek, GeekChicDaily, The L.A. Times, The Village Voice, LA Weekly, and Nerdist